[-] Emperor@feddit.uk -1 points 4 hours ago

I cheapskate the whole cinema-going experience - I have a monthly pass that is paid off by two or three visits a month (I go twice a week - one week last month I went 5 times, but 3 of those was a LotR marathon), plus I bring my own snacks and a bottle of water. Probably works out at the equivalent of three bucks a pop plus petrol, for big, wide reclining seats and iSense where available.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 6 points 4 hours ago

The film is a comedy/satire so perhaps he felt he pushed elements of it into wild and wacky territory that would be considered farfetched, possibly deranged.

However, the deranged bit refers to the people who are suggesting it is as conspiracy - it's one thing to use the idea in comedy movie and quite another that this would happen in real life. For one, that shot would be incredibly risky for someone to attempt especially without a sniper rifle or the relevant training.

I think he may be overreacting as it may not have even been mentioned if not for the Pennsylvania link.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 4 hours ago* (last edited 4 hours ago)

Right

edit: although I do like the idea of The Eight, some anonymous sinister force.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 4 hours ago

Zero-hours is always going to be the tricky one - I know people it works well for but it is also pretty exploitative. I have no idea how to fix it, perhaps pay a higher rate to those doing it because I've seen the grimace from those who value it's flexibility when they realise how little they take home.

36
submitted 7 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/movies@lemm.ee

Tim Robbins is shutting down any “deranged” comparisons between his 1992 film “Bob Roberts” and the assassination attempt on Donald Trump.

Conspiracies surfaced on social media after Thomas Matthew Crooks killed a Trump rallygoer and tried to assassinate the former president, injuring two others in the crowd as well. Robbins weighed in after one theory claimed the shooting was arranged by convicted felon Trump to boost his campaign for re-election, much like the plot of Robbins’ political drama “Bob Roberts.”

“To anyone drawing a parallel between my film ‘Bob Roberts’ and the attempted assassination of Trump, let’s be clear. What happened yesterday was a real attempt on a presidential candidate’s life,” Robbins wrote. “Those that are denying the assassination attempt was real are truly in a deranged mindset. A human being was shot yesterday. Another killed. They may not be human beings that you agree with politically but for shame folks. Get over your blind hatred of these people. They are fellow Americans. This collective hatred is killing our souls and consuming whatever is left of our humanity.”

“Bob Roberts” was written and directed by Robbins, who also starred. The film centered on the rise of a populist conservative politician (Robbins) who stages being shot by an assassin to win a U.S. Senate seat in Pennsylvania.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 9 points 7 hours ago

Going to the cinema is expensive and takes effort, so quick home releases will harm a movie's box office take but there's also an audience that, post-Covid, won't go to the cinema and I can see the temptation to milk that source if income too.

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submitted 7 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/movies@lemm.ee

Shortly after A Quiet Place: Day One's record-breaking opening weekend, there was online outrage after it was reported that the horror movie would be available to watch at home within a month of its cinema release.

This was only an alleged release date and nothing has been confirmed by Paramount even now. It sparked a debate, however, about how the report would impact Day One's chances at the box office, and a wider one about how movies just aren't given the time to build their audiences at the cinema.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 7 hours ago

Definitely searching for a point. I have enjoyed GotG3 and DS2, Shang-Chi had a lot of promise but blew it in the finale and while Thor: Love and Thunder was flawed it was still good fun.

As I've said before - they need to get back to making good movies with stories people want to tell and do the franchise building as an extra. Following Endgame they seemed to reverse that and franchise building became the most important thing. Luckily, it looks like.James Gunn knows this and isn't going to make the same mistake at DC (although the number of characters popping up in Superman has me a bit worried).

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 7 hours ago

Never released on DVD, it's about as obscure as it gets.

9
submitted 7 hours ago* (last edited 7 hours ago) by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/homevideo@feddit.uk

Coming on 4KUHD and Blu-ray!

Brand New HDR/DV Master – From a 4K Scan of the 35mm Original Camera Negative!

UFOria (1984) Starring Cindy Williams, Harry Dean Stanton, Fred Ward & Harry Carey Jr. – Shot by David Myers (THX 1138) – Music by Richard Baskin (Welcome to L.A.) – Written & Directed by John Binder (Endangered Species, The Lazarus Man).

From Facebook

IMDb

Tech specs at Blu-ray.com

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 4 points 8 hours ago

It'll never really go away, it'll just stop working after a while. Trying to fracture society is part of the eight's toolkit as it allows them to put the blame on the "other" (rather than themselves) and is classic divide and conqueror. If we're fighting each other, we aren't fighting them.

3
submitted 8 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/uk_politics@feddit.uk

Have you heard? The war is over. Not the ones in Ukraine or Gaza, unfortunately. The figurative war. The conflict of ideas. The culture wars.

At least that’s what Culture Secretary Lisa Nandy has said this week. “For too long, for too many people, the story we tell ourselves about ourselves as a nation has not reflected them, their communities or their lives,” she said in her first address to her department.

“This is how polarisation, division and isolation thrives. In recent years we’ve found multiple ways to divide ourselves from one another. And lost that sense of a self-confident, outward-looking country which values its own people in every part of the UK.

“Changing that is the mission of this department. The era of culture wars is over.”

...

It’s a nice thought. And I suppose it’s not totally baseless in the sense that people’s patience for culture wars really is wearing thin. For the past couple of years, polls and surveys have pointed to a decline in people buying into the myth that the biggest threats to their lives and lifestyles are groups that those stoking these conflicts have labelled the “wokerati”.

According to 2023 research from King’s College London and Ipsos Mori, six in 10 people now agree that “politicians invent or exaggerate culture wars as a political tactic” – that’s up from around four in 10 in 2020.

Two months ago, polling organisation More In Common found that people across the political spectrum had far more interest in political campaigns that focused on local issues than those that used culture war tactics to win support.

That we’re beginning to emerge from this era now is not simply a matter of people becoming bored of it all. It’s about the culture wars’ inability to divert attention from reality in perpetuity.

...

Nandy may have declared the culture wars over, but we need to remember that as long as there are cultural and social power struggles in society, there will be attempts to apportion blame somewhere.

So, if we want to ensure minority groups aren’t caught up in the fray, and that we stick to the task at hand of making society better and fairer, we can’t be complacent. We can’t pat ourselves on the back for no longer being susceptible to propaganda – that’s not going to prevent a future war by another name.

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submitted 8 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/uk_politics@feddit.uk

Labour’s plans for boosting workers’ rights are backed by voters across the political spectrum, including a majority of Conservative and Reform supporters, new polling commissioned by the TUC shows.

As the new government prepares to set out its programme in the king’s speech on Wednesday, the TUC is urging ministers to press ahead with implementing their manifesto pledges on workers’ rights in full.

In a poll of 3,000 voters carried out by Opinium on the day after the general election this month, almost two-thirds of respondents (64%) supported giving workers’ protection against unfair dismissal from day one of a job.

That included an overwhelming majority of Labour voters (81%), along with 55% of Conservative voters and 57% of those who backed Reform.

Similarly, more than two-thirds of those polled (67%) supported banning zero-hours contracts, which included 67% of Conservative voters and 72% of Reform voters.

Other aspects of Labour’s new deal for working people, including a ban on fire and rehire, also commanded majority support in the poll, including among voters who did not back Labour on 4 July.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 8 hours ago

Fun fact: just because something is illegal doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

I'd have definitely had a lot less fun if I'd steered clear if anything that breaks the law.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 2 points 9 hours ago

I'd forgotten about him, I was referring to Jo Cox.

[-] Emperor@feddit.uk 6 points 12 hours ago

Not according to the criteria in that graph.

It would be more damning if they said "part of a franchise".

15
submitted 13 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/scotland@feddit.uk

cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/14736241

Two of the original stars of the hit film Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory will appear at the Edinburgh Fringe as part of a musical parody based on a Glasgow event that left parents fuming and children in tears.

Julie Dawn Cole and Paris Themmen, who played Veruca Salt and Mike Teevee in the 1971 movie starring Gene Wilder, will co-narrate the stage reading of Willy's Candy Spectacular: A Musical Parody.

The show is based on the doomed Willy's Chocolate Experience, which sparked headlines across the globe after being advertised as a "chocolate fantasy" where "dreams become reality" - but instead turned out to be a sparsely decorated warehouse where children were limited to a couple of sweets and a quarter of a can of limeade.

...

The cast of the parody was unveiled on Monday afternoon, with a bill that also includes Shelley Regner (Pitch Perfect series), Eric Petersen (Shrek The Musical), Nicole Greenwood (In Plain Sight), Wilkie Ferguson (Motown: The Musical), Cassandra Parker (Cabaret) and musicians Monica Evans and Chris Villain.

The show, created by US producer Richard Kraft and directed by Andy Fickman, will run at the Pleasance King Dome from 9-26 August.

44
submitted 13 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/britishcomedy@feddit.uk

Two of the original stars of the hit film Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory will appear at the Edinburgh Fringe as part of a musical parody based on a Glasgow event that left parents fuming and children in tears.

Julie Dawn Cole and Paris Themmen, who played Veruca Salt and Mike Teevee in the 1971 movie starring Gene Wilder, will co-narrate the stage reading of Willy's Candy Spectacular: A Musical Parody.

The show is based on the doomed Willy's Chocolate Experience, which sparked headlines across the globe after being advertised as a "chocolate fantasy" where "dreams become reality" - but instead turned out to be a sparsely decorated warehouse where children were limited to a couple of sweets and a quarter of a can of limeade.

...

The cast of the parody was unveiled on Monday afternoon, with a bill that also includes Shelley Regner (Pitch Perfect series), Eric Petersen (Shrek The Musical), Nicole Greenwood (In Plain Sight), Wilkie Ferguson (Motown: The Musical), Cassandra Parker (Cabaret) and musicians Monica Evans and Chris Villain.

The show, created by US producer Richard Kraft and directed by Andy Fickman, will run at the Pleasance King Dome from 9-26 August.

17
submitted 14 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/movies@lemm.ee

“Longlegs,” an occult-tinged horror mystery about an FBI agent on the trail of a serial killer, opened to a phenomenal $22.6 million, easily outgrossing “Fly Me to the Moon,” a $100 million dollar rom-com featuring two of Hollywood’s brightest stars.

To pull off that upset, “Longlegs” got a lift from some sensational reviews, as well as a creepy performance by Nicolas Cage. The film’s opening weekend results are a record-breaking debut for Neon, the indie distributor that did an outstanding job of generating word-of-mouth for “Longlegs” thanks to a viral marketing campaign. It was one that saw the studio create a “90s-style website” highlighting the gruesome crimes of its antagonist, as well as a phone number that people could call to hear a demented message from Cage. It’s a page right out of the playbooks of previous cult hits like “The Blair Witch Project,” where it worked so well that it essentially created a new paradigm for building buzz, and “Snakes on a Plane,” where a bunch of people got personalized recordings of Samuel L. Jackson ranting about air travel and reptiles. “Longlegs” was directed by Osgood Perkins and stars “It Follows” breakout Maika Monroe, both of whom just turbocharged their asking prices.

What makes the result even more impressive is how little Neon shelled out to achieve its success. The movie was produced for under $10 million and the studio spent roughly the same amount to market and distribute “Longlegs.”

“This has been a really wild ride,” said Elissa Federoff, Neon’s chief distribution officer. “Working with the film’s creative team, we have been able to put together something really special. When you start with a film as wholly original as this one and you combine it with a fully fleshed out, bespoke marketing campaign, you can achieve something extraordinary.”

But even though “Longlegs” was the big story of the weekend, the top slot at the box office went to “Despicable Me 4,” which retained its box office crown after dominating moviegoing throughout the Fourth of July holiday. The animated comedy from Universal and Illumination earned $44.6 million in its second weekend of release, pushing its domestic total to $211.1 million. This week the companies announced they were making “Minions 3,” a “Despicable Me” spinoff, which is scheduled to hit theaters in 2027. The “Despicable Me” series recently topped $5 billion at the global box office, becoming the first animated franchise to hit that milestone.

17
submitted 15 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/forteana@feddit.uk

The fight over the science of an ancient Indonesian landmark has taken another turn in the archeological community—a controversial October 2023 study claiming that Gunung Padang is a pyramid created by humans 27,000 years ago was recently fully retracted from Wiley, the publishers of the journal Archaeological Prospection.

On one side, a robust range of leading archeologists seem perplexed on how the study ever made it past peer review and into print in the first place. On the other side, the team of authors call the retraction “unjust” and based on “unfounded claims raised by third parties who hold differing opinions and disbelieve in the evidence, analysis, and conclusions.”

Let’s go back to the science.

The Gunung Padang site in West Java, Indonesia, includes a raised earth site. The paper’s authors—led by Danny Natawidjaja—claim that it is the remnants of a prehistoric pyramid from up to 27,000 years ago, far surpassing the oldest known pyramid in the world at a mere 4,700 years old. The team based much of their findings on radiocarbon dating from core drilling. But the retraction says that the dating has no tie to human interaction, especially in a place not believed to have been inhabited at the time the paper’s authors say humans were hand-forming the pyramid.

It all adds up to an article with a “major error,” the publishers write in the retraction. “This error,” they say, “which was not identified during peer review, is that the radiocarbon dating was applied to soil samples that were not associated with any artifacts or features that could be readily interpreted as anthropogenic or ‘man-made.’ Therefore, the interpretation that the site is an ancient pyramid built 9,000 or more years ago is incorrect, and the article must be retracted.”

...

Add in the fact that there’s been no evidence of an advanced civilization at that site since the last ice age. While the soil samples may well be from 27,000 years ago, without the telltale signs of human activity—think charcoal or bone fragments—those skeptical of the study say there’s no reason to believe there was any sort of large settlement in the area during that time.

Natawidjaja and his team aren’t budging. They claim the soil samples “have been unequivocally established as man-made constructions” that feature three distinct phases of construction. They claim the shapes, composition, and arrangement of the stone bolsters the argument.

...

To complicate the skirmish a bit more, politics comes into play. The Gunung Padang hilltop site is a travel destination for those practicing Islamic and Hindu rituals, and more than a decade ago—according to The New York Times—the Indonesian government was funding the narrative that the site was an ancient pyramid. Graham Hancock interviewed Natawidjaja during a Netflix documentary, Ancient Apocalypse, that aired in 2022, and he promoted the site then as an ancient pyramid.

Hancock now supports Natawidjaja and denounced the retraction, but the Society for American Archaeology wrote an open letter arguing that Hancock’s documentary “devalues the archaeological profession on the basis of false claims and disinformation.”

The fight over Gunung Padang seemingly predates the controversial study.

Camps on both sides feel strongly about their position, and the middle ground of archeologists simply don’t believe the study’s evidence supports the conclusions. “It was unfortunate that the paper had to get to this stage,” Noel Tan, a Bangkok archaeologist who had concerns about the study, told The New York Times. “But it was better to be retracted than to have nothing said about it at all.”

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submitted 16 hours ago* (last edited 16 hours ago) by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/uk_politics@feddit.uk

The health secretary cited the Cass review into gender identity services as saying there was currently not enough evidence about the impact on young people of using puberty-suppressing hormones, which are occasionally used for children with gender dysphoria.

But Labour MPs including Stella Creasy said that while the review published earlier this year by the paediatrician Dr Hilary Cass recommended caution, this did not mean a complete ban.

In a lengthy thread on X on Sunday, Streeting said he was backing an emergency ban on their use, imposed by his Conservative predecessor, Victoria Atkins, which is being challenged in the high court.

News of Streeting’s decision prompted a reaction from some Labour MPs over the weekend, with Creasy saying the Cass review “recommended caution, not exclusion” on puberty blockers for children.

She wrote on X: “To those asking, will always be MP who listens to demand for better research & evidence base for help for those with gender dysphoria, not abandons them.”

Zarah Sultana, another backbencher, tweeted: “Labour’s manifesto promised to ‘remove indignities for trans people who deserve recognition & acceptance’. That entails ending the Tories’ ban on puberty blockers. Young people – cis & trans – must have access to healthcare they need. I’ll always stand with the trans community.”

Nadia Whittome said: “Only a small number of young people are prescribed puberty blockers. Those who are often describe them as lifesaving. I know the distress the puberty blockers ban is causing them. No matter what happens in court, I will continue fighting for the government to scrap it.”

...

Following his posts on social media, LGBT+ Labour published a letter to Streeting, signed by the organisation’s national trans officer, Dylan Naylor, and Willow Parker, the trans officer for the political party’s student wing.

They wrote: “In line with the review’s recommendations, steps must be taken to cut waiting lists for trans youth, address long-term staffing issues, move towards a decentralised, equitable system for accessing care (including through the provision of regional centres), provide comprehensive training for NHS staff on how best to support and work sensitively with trans and questioning young people, and better address the current toxicity of public debate which is actively harmful to young people.”

The authors called on the health secretary to “urgently set out the timeline, scope and nature” of a clinical trial and added: “We hope that, under this new Labour government, progress can be made to reset the public discussion on trans rights, centring on the humanity of, and compassion for, each individual trans person.”

Previously: Streeting's Xitter statements are discussed here, this is more about the reaction to them.

15
submitted 16 hours ago* (last edited 16 hours ago) by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/uk_politics@feddit.uk

The UK government’s adviser on political violence said the growth of a “toxic, dangerous environment” in public life increased the risk of there being an assassination attempt on a British politician, as he called on the home secretary to launch an investigation into the intimidation of candidates in the election.

John Woodcock wrote to Yvette Cooper on Friday expressing his concern that a series of incidents in the election campaign could have been a “concerted campaign by extremists” that “underlined the gravity of the threat to our democracy”.

In an interview with the Guardian on Sunday, Woodcock, who has the title Lord Walney, said the apparent attempted murder of Donald Trump was “a vivid reminder of the vulnerability of all politicians”.

He added: “We have seen the growth in the UK of US-style politics of aggressive confrontation and intimidation which is unfortunately, exactly the toxic environment that could lead to another assassination attempt on a UK politician, of which we have already tragically seen a number in recent years.”

Many political candidates and their staff suffered threats and intimidation in the run-up to the election. Several of those targeted were female Labour candidates standing in seats where there was a strong opposition to the party’s stance on the war in Gaza.

Woodcock said he believed intimidation was increasingly being used as “a core electoral strategy to try to either get candidates defeated or bully candidates into submission”. He added that there was a particular pattern of abuse “created by aggressive pro-Palestine activists”.

...

Woodcock, who was a Labour MP before becoming a cross-bench peer, was appointed by Boris Johnson’s government as an independent adviser on political violence and disruption. The findings of his review on the issue were published 24 hours before the election was called.

Titled Protecting Our Democracy from Coercion, his report was condemned by protest groups, including Greenpeace and Just Stop Oil. They said its proposals, which included a review of undercover surveillance of activists and making protest organisers pay towards policing, would “weaken democracy”.

See also: Election abuse of candidates may have been coordinated

109
submitted 19 hours ago by Emperor@feddit.uk to c/andfinally@feddit.uk

Conservative groups are threatening to block Switzerland from hosting next year’s Eurovision by forcing budget referendums on potential host cities, saying the song contest is a “propaganda event” that “celebrates satanism and occultism”.

Switzerland won the right to host the world’s largest live music event after the Swiss singer Nemo triumphed in Sweden with The Code. The cities of Zurich, Geneva, Bern and Basel have all filed applications to host the five-day spectacle.

The Christian conservative Federal Democratic Union of Switzerland (EDU) party, however, has said it will seek to make use of the country’s direct democracy system to put the bidding cities’ loan applications to the vote.

“The Eurovision song contest is a ghastly propaganda occasion”, the EDU said in a social media post on Tuesday. “A country that provides a stage to such disgusting trash won’t elevate its image but merely showcase its own intellectual decline.”

Samuel Kullmann, a senior EDU politician, told the Swiss broadcaster SRF his party was disturbed by Eurovision’s increasing “celebration, or at least tolerance of … satanism and occultism”. “More and more artists present openly occultist messages and underline them with respective symbols,” he said.

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